CDC Updated Information on Coronavirus and Guidance

Different parts of the country are seeing different levels of COVID-19 activity. The United States nationally is in the acceleration phase of the pandemic. The duration and severity of each pandemic phase can vary depending on the characteristics of the virus and the public health response. There are updates to the known symptoms of Coronavirus as well as new guidance and the continuance of previously recommended actions.


Symptoms of Coronavirus

Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness.

Watch for symptoms:

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus.

People with these following symptoms or combinations of symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Cough and/or Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Or at least two of these symptoms:

  • Fever, Chills, Repeated shaking with chills, Muscle pain, Headache, Sore throat, New loss of taste or smell

Children have similar symptoms to adults and generally have mild illness. This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. If you have any of the following emergency warning signs* for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately: Trouble breathing, Persistent pain or pressure in the chest, New confusion or inability to arouse, Bluish lips or face.


CDC on Homemade Cloth Face Coverings

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores, work and big box stores), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission. CDC advises the voluntary use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus. The cloth face cover is meant to protect other people in case you are infected and do not know it. Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure. cdc.gov has instructions on homemade cloth face coverings.

Cloth face coverings should—

  • Fit snugly but comfortably against the side of the face

  • Be secured with ties or ear loops

  • Include multiple layers of fabric

  • Allow for breathing without restriction

  • Be able to be laundered and machine dried without damage or change to shape

Cloth face coverings should be washed regularly depending on the frequency of use. A washing machine should suffice in properly washing a face covering. Individuals should be careful not to touch their eyes, nose, and mouth when removing their face covering and wash hands immediately after removing.

Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators. Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance. Do NOT use a facemask meant for a healthcare worker.


Know how it spreads

  • There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

  • The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.

  • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks.

  • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

  • Some recent studies have suggested that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms.

The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading very easily and sustainably between people. Information from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic suggest that this virus is spreading more efficiently than influenza, but not as efficiently as measles, which is highly contagious.


Clean and disinfect

Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks. If surfaces are dirty, clean them. Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection. Then, use a household disinfectant. Most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work.

Continue to: Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. (use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if you are unable to wash your hands). Avoid close contact with sick people, stay home as much as possible and put distance between yourself and other people. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or inside of your elbow.

This is a rapidly evolving situation, for up to date information go to the CDC’s website: cdc.gov